ThePolishGent
I know there has been talks about four new original films coming out after The Incredibles 2 and that got me to thinking, instead of thinking about what those films might be about involving "unusual worlds", how about we take this moment and think of what we would love to see from Pixar. 

To keep this short and to the point, personally, I would love to see a another film about confidence and believing in yourself. And what better way than making that the focus of fruit bats (flying foxes)! In fact, there have been some cute story books made about this specific topic and that have been told in their own unique way with bats but if Pixar took inspiration and try to make if in a heartfelt movie that anyone can relate to, I think it would be a major hit!

Also, here is a video to show of a baby fruit bat and plus, I included a character image that they can take inspiration to make the bat characters...



[gUgrqas]  

On a side note, I would also would love to see a new Toy Story movie but with a whole new cast of characters and a new story to go along with it.
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philly30
My Pixar dream film would be to see one of the stories I been working on to be turned in to a film. That a big dream of mine.
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ThePolishGent
philly30 wrote:
My Pixar dream film would be to see one of the stories I been working on to be turned in to a film. That a big dream of mine.


That's wonderful!! I'm always for supporting people who are wanting to write stories for animated films!
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ReptilePatrol
I'd love to see Pixar make something a bit similar to Gravity Falls. Not in a literal sense (it's important that Pixar retain originality, of course) but in spirit. Gravity Falls epitomizes perfectly what makes Pixar great: sharp humor, brilliant writing (common shared themes revolve around aging), well-crafted characters, timeless plot twists (plot twists that don't rely on the element of surprise and therefore don't get old that fast - a difficult thing to achieve), a simply incredible amount of heart, and pure, ingenious, wonder-inducing design.

I'd also love to see Pixar make something a bit similar to The Dam Keeper. The Dam Keeper is already overtly Pixarian given how both its directors started the short at Pixar before moving out to finish it, all while receiving lots of help from other Pixar artists, but in my opinion the short film tops Pixar's entire shorts filmography. Again, this is another thing that epitomizes perfectly what Pixar does best: brilliant writing, well-crafted characters, timeless plot twists, a simply incredible amount of heart, and pure, ingenious, wonder-inducing design.

I realize that I'm not being entirely original myself by citing existing works instead of proposing new ideas, but these two are the first things that pop into my mind with your question. However, much like how twentieth century Disney Feature Animation was heavily influenced by Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and how all modern computer animation is heavily influenced by Pixar, and how all virtually all modern animation in general is influenced by Hayao Miyazaki, art, however original, is often always just a component of whatever is influencing the artist, repackaged rather nicely. And influences aren't always previously existing works either — although Pixar often screens Miyazaki films when they need inspiration. Andrew Stanton has confessed that Finding Nemo was heavily influenced by what he was going through as a father, and Pete Docter has said Inside Out was heavily influenced by what he mused was going on in his daughter's mind. Thus, if I were a director or writer at Pixar, the two main influences I'd probably draw on are Gravity Falls and The Dam Keeper, my favorite TV show and short film, respectively (my favorite films list is rather dominated by Pixar so I haven't mentioned that here).

I'm not exactly sure what original ideas would be possible out of Gravity Falls and The Dam Keeper. In regards to the former, I think it'd be awesome if Pixar tackled a comedy-mystery; not like Zootopia, where I feel the tone often shifted between comedy and mystery, but more like Gravity Falls, where the two elements are intricately intertwined, with comedy employed as a tool to keep the mystery unpredictable: absurdism and irreverency are used to great effect in the show to make unpredictable plot twists (with the use of comedy, everything becomes relevant, because the mystery is totally unpredictable, thus making the audience very engaged - Pixar, on the other hand, tends to rely on a mix of heart and humor for engagement instead).

In regards to the latter, I think it'd be awesome if Pixar made a film about friendship and social exclusion; social exclusion is a very serious issue I'm sure a lot of people encounter daily (both kids and adults), and I'm surprised at how little this is dealt with in modern animated films, which often sugarcoat such issues or present them as merely elements of character development (for example, in Finding Nemo/Dory, we find out that Dory has a very hard time making friends ("No one's ever stuck with me for this long"/the opening montage of FD) yet this is relegated to being simply an unfortunate circumstance of her earlier life to build character, and isn't something that is explored closely and more delicately. Pixar has dealt with mature themes before, whether it be failure (MU), coping with grief (Up), midlife crisis (The Incredibles) or living with a disability (Finding Dory), but one theme they haven't yet touched on is social exclusion (and its opposite/solution of sorts, friendship). Well to be fair they've touched on friendship, but usually in a romanticized way to tug at our heartstrings (The Good Dinosaur is a great example), and never as something intricately linked to our human need to connect with others, or as an antidote to the pain and loneliness one feels when they're rejected or excluded.
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ThePolishGent
ReptilePatrol wrote:
I'd love to see Pixar make something a bit similar to Gravity Falls. Not in a literal sense (it's important that Pixar retain originality, of course) but in spirit. Gravity Falls epitomizes perfectly what makes Pixar great: sharp humor, brilliant writing (common shared themes revolve around aging), well-crafted characters, timeless plot twists (plot twists that don't rely on the element of surprise and therefore don't get old that fast - a difficult thing to achieve), a simply incredible amount of heart, and pure, ingenious, wonder-inducing design.

I'd also love to see Pixar make something a bit similar to The Dam Keeper. The Dam Keeper is already overtly Pixarian given how both its directors started the short at Pixar before moving out to finish it, all while receiving lots of help from other Pixar artists, but in my opinion the short film tops Pixar's entire shorts filmography. Again, this is another thing that epitomizes perfectly what Pixar does best: brilliant writing, well-crafted characters, timeless plot twists, a simply incredible amount of heart, and pure, ingenious, wonder-inducing design.

I realize that I'm not being entirely original myself by citing existing works instead of proposing new ideas, but these two are the first things that pop into my mind with your question.


I've always consider new stories inspire by other existing stories to still be original and creative so you're not at all being unoriginal with your ideas! Stories and films can still be original as long it's not a blatant copy (looking at you Illumination Entertainment). Heck, The Brave Little Toaster was actually a big inspiration into making the first Toy Story movie and the people who also work on The Brave Little Toaster are also the same group of people went on to work at Pixar Animation Studios! That's why I mention of what I would love to see from Pixar is also part of inspiration. Nightsong is one of those story books (which by the way, that I forgot to mention) that they can use to take inspiration and make it into a movie.

As for what you would love to see from Pixar, I really like your ideas! I've still have yet to see Gravity Falls but I do know what it is about and the theme it has along with it. Right now, I'm currently working on Steven Universe as of this moment but I am aware of The Dam Keeper! It really is a very deep emotional heartfelt story. These stories can indeed make wonderful ideas for new feature length animated films!

You did a great job of naming examples of topics and issues that Pixar has cover. There's certainly a lot more topics that Pixar can cover on. I personally think that Pixar can make a better movie involving midlife crisis. Maybe that's where the sequel for Inside Out can come in hand! [wink]

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Sally
I would love to see a Pixar film with insipiration from films from the 80s, 90s, or 2000s, or more like a 'kiddie remake' of a film (it could still be an original) since half of those films are PG-13 or R rated and sadly kids can't enjoy those, and im not saying 'rip off that movie' but to re-twitch that film in an animated way so kids can understand those films better

Here's some of my personal favorites that could be use for ideas:

-Driving Miss Daisy
-Rain Man
-Almost Famous
-Braveheart
-American Beauty
-Fargo
-The Silence of the Lambs
-A Room with a View
-Time Bandits
-A Beautiful Mind
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Vellerie
I think it'd be cool if Pixar did an outright (epic?) fantasy storyline. It could be inspired by any historical culture or one of their own, about humans and perhaps including "humanoid" races. Something along the lines of children's fantasies such as Megan Whalen Turner's books, Dianna Wynne Jones, The Dark is Rising, or Chronicles of Prydain. Or a family friendly version of Perdido Street Station or Twelve Kings in Sharakhai. The possibilities are huge, really. I'm not sure something large-scale like that is really their style, but it'd still be interesting seeing what they would do with it, hypothetically.
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ReptilePatrol
ThePolishGent wrote:


I've always consider new stories inspire by other existing stories to still be original and creative so you're not at all being unoriginal with your ideas! Stories and films can still be original as long it's not a blatant copy (looking at you Illumination Entertainment). Heck, The Brave Little Toaster was actually a big inspiration into making the first Toy Story movie and the people who also work on The Brave Little Toaster are also the same group of people went on to work at Pixar Animation Studios! That's why I mention of what I would love to see from Pixar is also part of inspiration. Nightsong is one of those story books (which by the way, that I forgot to mention) that they can use to take inspiration and make it into a movie.

As for what you would love to see from Pixar, I really like your ideas! I've still have yet to see Gravity Falls but I do know what it is about and the theme it has along with it. Right now, I'm currently working on Steven Universe as of this moment but I am aware of The Dam Keeper! It really is a very deep emotional heartfelt story. These stories can indeed make wonderful ideas for new feature length animated films!

You did a great job of naming examples of topics and issues that Pixar has cover. There's certainly a lot more topics that Pixar can cover on. I personally think that Pixar can make a better movie involving midlife crisis. Maybe that's where the sequel for Inside Out can come in hand! [wink]



Gravity Falls is amazing. I cannot recommend it more; it's my favorite animated work of all time. Once you finish Steven Universe, I'd highly recommend Gravity Falls next.

I think The Incredibles was fantastic in its handling of the midlife crisis, but an Inside Out-style film would probably bring a fresher, more interesting perspective to it.

What Sally said just gave me a new thought ... I think it would be fantastic if Brad Bird upped the ante on The Incredibles 2 and made it PG-13. Or any director on any future Pixar project, for that matter. But I cite Bird in particular because he once said,

"I reject that whole point of view - that animation is a children's medium. The way people talk about it is, well, hey, it's a good thing I have kids, because now I get to see this. Well, hey, no, man! You can just go and see it. There's no other art form that is defined in such a narrow way. It's narrowminded, and I can't wait for it to die."

Yet the incredible irony is that Bird himself partakes in the self-ghettoization of the animation industry; all three of his animated films are children-appropriate, even if they do have elements that go over kids' heads. Pixar has certainly been doing its part in ending this stereotype by ensuring all their films appeal to a general audience instead of aiming exclusively at children, but still this approach always earns their films family-friendly classifications and thus perpetuates the notion that animation is always okay for children.

The Incredibles is arguably the least child-appropriate film of all of Pixar's filmography, given all the violence and subtle sexual content, but it's still clear that Bird restrained himself there too to avoid that PG-13. Imagine if he got permission on The Incredibles 2 to operate free of such restraints, and how much more awesome he'd be able to make it if he didn't have to constantly censor himself! Coincidentally, next month Sausage Party comes out, and reportedly it's a bold parody of the very thing I am talking about here — Pixar's obsession with appealing to children despite often being presented as a prestigious studio with more mature fare compared to the rest of the industry.

I'm not saying that all of Pixar's films should take a more approach direction, just that they shouldn't operate exclusively with G and PG titles. Animation is one of the most diverse mediums of expression available, and Pixar proved this to great effect with the groundbreaking Toy Story, which revolutionized the industry not only with the shift from traditional to computer animation, but also in storytelling, from Disney-esque musicals and romanticized fables to today's more prevelent use of straightforward narratives more akin to live-action films. And it's rather ironic to see the company that once revolutionized the animation industry now fall into a rut of churning out exclusively CGI family friendly fantasy films (to be fair, most of which are amazing) — so I think it'd be awesome if they revolutionized the industry again by pushing animation to the fullest extent possible (imagine if Persepolis, Anomalisa, Princess Mononoke or other adult animated films received a Pixar blockbuster-style release and marketing campaign, and how much of an impact that'd have on the entire industry ...)
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ThePolishGent
ReptilePatrol wrote:
Gravity Falls is amazing. I cannot recommend it more; it's my favorite animated work of all time. Once you finish Steven Universe, I'd highly recommend Gravity Falls next. I think The Incredibles was fantastic in its handling of the midlife crisis, but an Inside Out-style film would probably bring a fresher, more interesting perspective to it.


Will do! It sure does looks awesome! The funny part is that there is fans on both sides of both shows arguing of which of the two is better. I'm not at all going to join in the argument but I think both shows share some similarities.

Also, in regards to The Incredibles, I do want to say that I did not at all care for that film whatsoever. And it's just like what you just say that sums it all up and that is "The Incredibles is arguably the least child-appropriate film" which includes all the content and themes you just listed. The jokes and interactions between the characters were really too adult like and I find it to be really depressing despite the fact that this movie was covering the topic of midlife crisis. I also know a lot of it had to do with the tone down colors that they use for many of the scenes in the movie. On a side note, I do find it really funny that Cars which is a film that it's target audience is for little children is the complete opposite with it's bright colors, cheery story, fluffy jokes and that film came out after The Incredibles.

You do have point in regards to the target audience and movie ratings. Like you said, "Animation is one of the most diverse mediums of expression". Pixar along with Disney, Studio Ghibli and along with many others studios including those in all over Europe have indeed prove that with their creative story telling. You don't need over the top violence, explicit jokes or swearing to appeal to the adults. That's why I've always consider animation to be my all time favorite form of entertainment. Granted, I will occasionally watch some Polish cartoons that really don't have a major plot but just simple little short stories just because they're fun to watch. But aside from that, like you said, if Studio Ghibli has a somewhat as similar success equivalent to a major Pixar style release here in the U.S., I think it would be a major success! I would also think the for same thing for a European animated movie such as Song Of The Sea! So I'm all for continuing to revolutionize the animation industry.

But personally, I do fell happy with Pixar just putting out G and PG rated movies. But if Pixar wants to to make The Incredibles 2 with a PG-13 rating, then they can. I personally won't be seeing it. They already do such a fantastic job of appealing to everyone I just think it feels unnecessary to go beyond PG rating. 

That's why I consider Inside Out to be one of the best movies for both children and adults because it has a the right enough balance of humor and drama and the perfect story to go along with it. It has jokes made for both children and adults but also some adults jokes that they can catch on as well without going explicit and plus you can really relate to the characters a lot. Heck, in a lot of ways, I kinda consider Inside Out to be a film made specifically more to the adults than to children and that's mainly do to it's theme and message along with the adult mannerisms that the emotions have that made us feel connected to the characters. Not just the jokes. As children grow older, they will understand it much more. That's why, I think Pixar has already accomplish the task of making a perfect film specially made for the adults.
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ReptilePatrol
I definitely agree with what you said in regards to how Pixar has been incredibly successful with curating an adult following while keeping its content G or PG, and that it's certainly not *necessary* to go PG-13 (The Incredibles is an excellent example of how PG can work splendid for a superhero/sci-fi movie, even while most of its live-action counterparts are PG-13).

However I'm just saying that by limiting themselves exclusively to the family-friendly zone, it's ironic in how it goes against the notion of animation being a truly limitless medium. Every single Pixar feature has been a computer animated fantasy-comedy with overt adult offerings whilst remaining child appropriate at all times — and almost every single one of them have been truly amazing movies — but this in no way represents the limits of what's possible with the medium. Toy Story may have revolutionized the animation industry, but the format it introduced then has become the norm now and doesn't show any sign of changing.

If Pixar simply continued its current path of churning out amazing animated features (even if all of them are computer animated, fantasy-comedies that appeal to a general audience), that'd be awesome and I'd be totally fine with it. In fact, their consistency is what has helped ensure they keep their quality up (compared to, say, DreamWorks, which takes a more experimental approach). But it would be my dream Pixar film if Pixar revolutionized the animation industry once more, like the way they did all the way back in 1995.

Although the only animation medium that currently has a chance at supplanting computer animation as the mainstream go-to medium for blockbuster animated features is virtual reality (and even that is years away, if theaters adopt it at all), I believe there's still room in the industry for a similarly disruptive new force, and that's letting animation live up to its fullest potential, by entering the mainstream as a medium as widely exploited as live-action, as compared to the ghetto it exists in now, being used to make big bucks off of family entertainment (becsuse apparently once a few (Pixar) CGI family films smash the box office, then CGI family films is all Hollywood wants to do with animation (looking at you Illumination Entertainment)).

The entire industry is in a rut, partly because Pixar has been so successful (and now everyone else is trying to cash in). Occasionally we get reprieve in the form of independent animation (GKIDS has restored my faith in the industry so many times) but otherwise the mainstream animation market in North America has been fantasy-comedies aimed at a family audience. And the incredible success these films make only encourages Hollywood to stick exclusively to this use of animation.

It reminds me, again, of 1995. Disney Feature Animation had just gone through The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, and The Lion King. Back then a successful animated feature was defined as a traditionally animated musical comedy with an "I want" song, love story, and villain — because that's what was financially successful. And when a non-DFA film comes along (looking at The Nightmare Before Christmas), it follows this format. But then Toy Story came along, and oh boy did it upturn things — not just visually with the introduction of computer animation for a feature film, but also narratively, ditching the musical format and relegating the love story and villain to minor elements (and later removing these two completely in later films when Pixar gained more confidence).

It was so, so incredibly refreshing to see Pixar upturn the industry like that, destroying the formulaic way Hollywood was using animation as a box office farming tool instead of an art form, by giving the world a much different look at what a successful animated feature could be, by presenting a revolutionary film that flew in the face of the then-ubiquitous, now-obsolete traditionally animated musical. Toy Story proved that you could do anything with animation and that you needn't be bound by Hollywood's conservative, formulaic approach (which ironically now revolves around the Toy Story model). And it would be my dream to see Pixar do that again: introduce something not just great, but revolutionary, and thus change the industry forever once more.

Perhaps it's a far-fetched dream. But hey, that's what this thread is for, right?
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ThePolishGent
ReptilePatrol wrote:
It was so, so incredibly refreshing to see Pixar upturn the industry like that, destroying the formulaic way Hollywood was using animation as a box office farming tool instead of an art form, by giving the world a much different look at what a successful animated feature could be, by presenting a revolutionary film that flew in the face of the then-ubiquitous, now-obsolete traditionally animated musical. Toy Story proved that you could do anything with animation and that you needn't be bound by Hollywood's conservative, formulaic approach (which ironically now revolves around the Toy Story model). And it would be my dream to see Pixar do that again: introduce something not just great, but revolutionary, and thus change the industry forever once more.


Well we all know that Pixar comes up with many wonderful stories and themes so I'm sure that can they can take the creative thinking process to the next level.
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Willheinz
I would love to see Pixar making an actual comedy-drama. Not in the sense of something like Up, where the drama was around the beginning and end of the film and almost everything else is comedy. Think Inside Llewyn Davis or 50/50, where something funny happens immediately gets turned to be very melancholic.

Also, I'd love to see them do a romantic comedy film. I know Toy Story 4 is said to be one, so we'll see how it goes. I'm hoping for them to make something like Her, 500 Days of Summer or Lost in Translation. The concepts of rom-coms may be a little over-saturated, but if done right, the warm fuzzy feeling you get after watching it never gets old.

And finally, although I think it would take them a million years to do this, but it would be awesome if Pixar made a non-narrative, experimental film. Kind of like The Tree of Life or Boyhood (both films which everyone should check out by the way).
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ThePolishGent
Willheinz wrote:
I would love to see Pixar making an actual comedy-drama. Not in the sense of something like Up, where the drama was around the beginning and end of the film and almost everything else is comedy. Think Inside Llewyn Davis or 50/50, where something funny happens immediately gets turned to be very melancholic. Also, I'd love to see them do a romantic comedy film. I know Toy Story 4 is said to be one, so we'll see how it goes.


It's going to be interesting of how they're going to pull off a romantic comedy film. While I'm open minded about it, I'm still skeptical about the fourth installment of Toy Story.
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